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Student event in Wageningen: Space exploration and life sciencehttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Articles/Student-event-Wageningen-2017.aspxStudent event in Wageningen: Space exploration and life scienceWageningen UR and TIME SCALE, in cooperation with ESA Education Office, invite you to an inspirational and social space-event, March 22, 2017. Meet astronaut Kevin A. Ford and see how you can participate in space research.<br>
TIME SCALE student competitionhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Articles/Student-competition.aspxTIME SCALE student competitionDo you want to take your research project to microgravity? To feel like an astronaut in weightlessness? Join the TIME SCALE student competition; write an outline of a Fly Your Thesis! application, and receive help from the TIME SCALE consortium to complete your full application for a parabolic flight.<br>
Plant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysishttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Scientific/IPPS-2016.aspxPlant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysisPoster presentation at the 4th International Plant Phenotyping Symposium, December 2016: <em>"Plant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysis for space and terrestrial applications"</em>
TIME SCALE general posterhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Scientific/TIME-SCALE-general-poster.aspxTIME SCALE general posterGeneral poster presentation of the TIME SCALE project, March 2016<em></em>
Space and sustainable foodhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Media/Space-and-sustainable-food.aspxSpace and sustainable foodThe Horizon 2020 EU project TIME SCALE conducts research towards future space missions and sustainable food production on Earth. <em>English article in Science & Technology.</em>

About TIME SCALE

So far, humans have performed short duration journeys to the Moon and astronauts have been living onboard the International Space Station since the year 2000. The astronauts are dependent on regular supplies. Each day, crew members require around 30 kg of water, food and air. Growing plants in space opens up new possibilities for long-term missions, and may in the future reduce the burden of bringing or shuttling provisions. Ultimately, advanced cultivation systems may provide astronauts with space-grown food, and closed regenerative life support system may recycle water, nutrients, air and waste in a viable ecosystem.
Read more
Plant research is carried out onboard the International Space Station using research platforms such as the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a small and experimental "greenhouse" system. TIME SCALE aims at new cultivation and monitoring technology for EMCS that will make possible a new generation of advanced experiments on food plants and algae bioreactors.
Read more
TIME SCALE develops new plant production technology for monitoring nutrient levels in soilless cultivation systems and remote sensing of plant health. Such knowledge and technology on nutrient and water recycling, and early warning systems for crop suboptimal growth conditions have significant relevance for terrestrial greenhouse systems.
Read more

 

 

Student event in Wageningen: Space exploration and life sciencehttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Articles/Student-event-Wageningen-2017.aspxStudent event in Wageningen: Space exploration and life scienceWageningen UR and TIME SCALE, in cooperation with ESA Education Office, invite you to an inspirational and social space-event, March 22, 2017. Meet astronaut Kevin A. Ford and see how you can participate in space research.<br>
TIME SCALE student competitionhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Articles/Student-competition.aspxTIME SCALE student competitionDo you want to take your research project to microgravity? To feel like an astronaut in weightlessness? Join the TIME SCALE student competition; write an outline of a Fly Your Thesis! application, and receive help from the TIME SCALE consortium to complete your full application for a parabolic flight.<br>
Plant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysishttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Scientific/IPPS-2016.aspxPlant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysisPoster presentation at the 4th International Plant Phenotyping Symposium, December 2016: <em>"Plant health monitoring using multispectral imaging and volatile analysis for space and terrestrial applications"</em>
TIME SCALE general posterhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Scientific/TIME-SCALE-general-poster.aspxTIME SCALE general posterGeneral poster presentation of the TIME SCALE project, March 2016<em></em>
Space and sustainable foodhttp://timescale.eu/Pages/Media/Space-and-sustainable-food.aspxSpace and sustainable foodThe Horizon 2020 EU project TIME SCALE conducts research towards future space missions and sustainable food production on Earth. <em>English article in Science & Technology.</em>

About TIME SCALE

So far, humans have performed short duration journeys to the Moon and astronauts have been living onboard the International Space Station since the year 2000. The astronauts are dependent on regular supplies. Each day, crew members require around 30 kg of water, food and air. Growing plants in space opens up new possibilities for long-term missions, and may in the future reduce the burden of bringing or shuttling provisions. Ultimately, advanced cultivation systems may provide astronauts with space-grown food, and closed regenerative life support system may recycle water, nutrients, air and waste in a viable ecosystem.
Read more
Plant research is carried out onboard the International Space Station using research platforms such as the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), a small and experimental "greenhouse" system. TIME SCALE aims at new cultivation and monitoring technology for EMCS that will make possible a new generation of advanced experiments on food plants and algae bioreactors.
Read more
TIME SCALE develops new plant production technology for monitoring nutrient levels in soilless cultivation systems and remote sensing of plant health. Such knowledge and technology on nutrient and water recycling, and early warning systems for crop suboptimal growth conditions have significant relevance for terrestrial greenhouse systems.
Read more